Amazing pictures of rare solar eclipse from around the world

Solar eclipse
The stunning event was seen by astronomers in 12 countries – but not the UK (Picture: PA)

 

A partial solar eclipse wowed stargazers in Asia, Africa and parts of the Middle East this weekend.

The event is known as a ‘ring of fire’ because most of the sun was covered by the moon.

Millions of people, from China to the UAE, and India to Japan watched the solar spectacle. In Dubai, those watching the event could see the moon covering over 85% of the sun, with photographers taking stunning photos of the eclipse over the Burj Khalifa building.

The event will not be seen again in the Emirate for another 14 years, according to chief executive officer of Dubai Astronomy Group Hasan al-Hariri. He said that while the ongoing coronavirus pandemic had halted their plans for a gathering to see the rare phenomena, the group has turned to the internet to help people observe the partial eclipse, providing a live feed of the moon as it passes between the earth and the sun.

The UK did not see the event, which was only visible in 12 countries.

Mr al-Hariri explained: ‘An eclipse is kind of a rare event.

‘It usually happens two times in a year, but it differs from location to location so it’s not fixed in one location.’

He continued: ‘Now we were fortunate to have it, the one which was in December last year and this one, and then we will have one similar to this after 14 years.

Image composition) A view of solar eclipse as seen in the sky from Jaipur, Rajasthan, India,June 21, 2020.
An image composition shows the solar eclipse as seen in the sky from Jaipur, Rajasthan, India, yesterday (Picture: PA)

 

 The rare total solar eclipse appears in sky in Chenzhou, Hunan, China Partial solar eclipse, China - 21 Jun 2020
The rare event in Chenzhou, Hunan, China (Picture: REX)

 

The moon partially covered the sun during an annular solar eclipse in Kolkata. People are seeing this dramatic
A photographer captures a dramatic ring of fire in Kolkata, West Bengal, India (Picture: REX)

 

Flares of the partially eclipsed sun are seen during the annular solar eclipse, at Akshardham, on June 21, 2020 in New Delhi, India. India witnessed the annual solar eclipse or ?surya grahan? 2020. This is the third eclipse for this year after the first two lunar eclipses took place in January and June. This is the last annual solar eclipse in India of this decade. The solar eclipse started from around 9 am across India. The eclipse will continue for over three hours covering 84 per cent Sun.
Flares of the partially eclipsed sun are seen from Akshardham, New Delhi, India (Picture: PA)

 

A partial solar eclipse is seen from Sector 11, near DAV High School, on June 21, 2020 in Gurugram, India. India witnessed the annual solar eclipse or ?surya grahan? 2020. This is the third eclipse for this year after the first two lunar eclipses took place in January and June. This is the last annual solar eclipse in India of this decade. The solar eclipse started from around 9 am across India. The eclipse will continue for over three hours covering 84 per cent Sun.
Cloudy skies added to the eerie view in Gurugram, India, during the last solar eclipse in the country this decade (Picture: PA)

 

The annular solar eclipse is seen on June 21, 2020 in Xiamen, Fujian Province of China.
Xiamen, Fujian Province of China saw a thin ring in the sky (Picture: Visual China Group)

 

Solar eclipse seen against cloudy sky at Kurla, on June 21, 2020 in Mumbai, India.
Trees and birds are outlined by the mystical light in Kurla, Mumbai, India, yesterday (Picture: PA)

 

‘So it’s kind of something a bit rare to observe.’

The observatory also sold solar eclipse glasses to the public to observe the eclipse safely.

An overcast sky did not deter enthusiasts in India with the partial eclipse also visible in the New Delhi sky.

The event started from around 9am in India and continued for more than three hours.

It was the last annual solar eclipse in the country this decade.

For more stories like this, check our news page.

Follow us:
FacebooktwitterlinkedintumblrinstagramFacebooktwitterlinkedintumblrinstagram

Share this:
FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailFacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail